Arpa 11

Pitches and presentations

Reach Out and Network
Elevator Pitch

Introduction — What Are Your Talking Points?

Keywords

Humor
Storytelling, narrative
Repetition
Visual Aids
Gestures
Preparation
Persuasion
Affect
Audience

Reading

What are your talking points?

Exercise

Take 10 minutes to prepare and then present to us your "Elevator Pitch" talking points.

Persuasion

How is good writing different from good presentation? What do they have in common?

Presentation Skills

Toastmasters
Here are some proven tips on how to control your butterflies and give better presentations:1

1. Know your material. Pick a topic you are interested in. Know more about it than you include in your speech. Use humor, personal stories and conversational language – that way you won’t easily forget what to say.
2. Practice. Practice. Practice! Rehearse out loud with all equipment you plan on using. Revise as necessary. Work to control filler words; Practice, pause and breathe. Practice with a timer and allow time for the unexpected.
3. Know the audience. Greet some of the audience members as they arrive. It’s easier to speak to a group of friends than to strangers.
4. Know the room. Arrive early, walk around the speaking area and practice using the microphone and any visual aids.
5. Relax. Begin by addressing the audience. It buys you time and calms your nerves. Pause, smile and count to three before saying anything. ("One one-thousand, two one-thousand, three one-thousand. Pause. Begin.) Transform nervous energy into enthusiasm.
6. Visualize yourself giving your speech. Imagine yourself speaking, your voice loud, clear and confident. Visualize the audience clapping – it will boost your confidence.
7. Realize that people want you to succeed. Audiences want you to be interesting, stimulating, informative and entertaining. They’re rooting for you.
8. Don’t apologize for any nervousness or problem – the audience probably never noticed it.
9. Concentrate on the message – not the medium. Focus your attention away from your own anxieties and concentrate on your message and your audience.
10. Gain experience. Mainly, your speech should represent you — as an authority and as a person. Experience builds confidence, which is the key to effective speaking.

Presentation Styles and Techniques

Techniques:

Using Powerpoint

Gestures

Case Studies

1. Hans Rosling — global health professor, statistics expert

2. Steve Jobs — CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios

transcript

3. Barack Obama — presidential hopeful, 2008
Obama
full speech


lyrics

Discussion: Elements of Effective presentations

Humor
Storytelling
Entertainment
Repetition
Visual Aids and Powerpoint
Gestures
Preparation
Argument
Affect — confident, nervous, knowledgable, etc.
Audience involvement

Assignment

Proposals and Pitches

More great presentations:
TED

For Fun:

Proofreading

Great use of visuals

next classes:
review

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License This site is the work of L. Hornbake, with participation by students.